N.T. Wright – A Helpful Illustration

“Five people are describing the same event. One says ‘I was aware of a blur of colour and a sudden loud noise.’ The next says ‘I saw and heard a vehicle driving noisily down the road.’ The next says ‘I saw an ambulance on its way to the hospital.’ The fourth says ‘I have just witnessed a tragedy.’ The fifth says ‘This is the end of the world for me.’ The same event gives rise to five true statements, with each successive one having more ‘meaning’ than the one before.” (The New Testament and the People of God, 282-83).

Right there, my friends, is why the Old Testament and the New Testament are speaking about exactly the same thing; namely, the death and resurrection of Jesus with all its implications. Jeremiah and Peter had different vantage points on the same event.

Failure to get this has led, outside the church, to endless writing on the “contradictions” in Scripture; inside the church, it led to old-school dispensationalism. Oh bother.

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Lewis on Choices

“I would much rather say that every time you make a choice you are turning the central part of you, the part of you that chooses, into something a little different from what it was before. And taking your life as a whole, with all your innumerable choices, all your life long you are slowly turning this central thing into a Heaven creature or into a hellish creature: either into a creature that is in harmony with God, and with other creatures, and with itself, or else into one that is in a state of war and hatred with God, and with its fellow creatures, and with itself. To be the one kind of creature is Heaven: that is, it is joy, and peace, and knowledge, and power. To be the other means madness, horror, idiocy, rage, impotence, and eternal loneliness. Each of us at each moment is progressing to the one state or the other.”

From Mere Christianity, as quoted in Rueben P. Job and Norman Shawchuck, A Guide to Prayer for Ministers and Other Servants (Nashville: Upper Room, 1983), 125-126.